Is Physical Therapy painful, or does it have to hurt to get better?

April 8, 2012

Q: Is Physical Therapy supposed to be painful. I have been having neck and shoulder pain for a long time and I don’t really want to go to therapy because I am afraid it will hurt.

A: I do not believe with most patients that physical therapy is supposed to be painful. My patients are coming to me so they can hurt less, not hurt more. Even patients who have had recent surgery should expect to feel better after each physical therapy session. Read the rest of this entry »


Why should you exercise? Because Holding Babies Rocks!

March 25, 2012

Mom holding baby Breslin

I wanted to write a post about Six Shoulder Exercises for Arthritis. I wanted to describe how our advanced shoulder program helps those with arthritis problems. I have had numerous men and women with arthritic shoulders that have responded very well to a simple home exercise program. I wanted to talk about how our program will help shoulders move easier, how you will have less pain, so you can do simple daily chores like getting dressed, or putting dishes up in the cupboard or adjusting your seatbelt. These are all difficult for people with arthritis in their shoulder.

Then I realized none of those things will get you excited about exercise, and, if you are not excited about exercise, you will not exercise. If you do not exercise, then I am not helping you.

So, instead of writing about a patient who you might relate to so you will exercise your shoulder, I am going to write about babies. More specifically, holding babies. Read the rest of this entry »


Old Guys not Working Out

February 26, 2012

A Gathering of Industrious Men

One of the problems with old guys working out is that they don’t. Men, especially men from my father’s generation and my grandfather’s generation were an industrious sort. They did not typically have time for play or for exercise. Maybe the occasional round of golf, but fitness? Pfft! There was work that needed to be done. And the time for doing it was now.

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Read the rest of this entry »


Full-time Athlete, Part-time Patient – A Sports Injury story (part 3)

December 15, 2011

Athletes, especially upper level athletes usually deal with joint or muscle injuries throughout their careers. My daughter Jesse is being a guest author this week. She was a competitive gymnast for 15 years and a competitive diver for 5 years. Today she is talking about how much she enjoyed having parents who were physical therapists. 

I don’t want to go to rehab, I said, “No!, No! No!”

Jesse in her White Coat

What is more important than the injuries themselves is the recovery.  And no, I’m not about to tell you that I’m the perfect patient and have only recovered well due to my dedication to my rehabilitation.  Quite the contrary, I’m probably one of the worst and least compliant patients.  I refuse to let either of my parents dictate what is right and wrong, and I’m sure this was ten times worse when I was an adolescent teenager. Read the rest of this entry »


Full-time Athlete, Part-time Patient – A Sports Injury story (part 2)

December 14, 2011

Athletes, especially upper level athletes, usually deal with joint or muscle injuries throughout their careers. My daughter Jesse is being a guest author this week. She was a competitive gymnast for 15 years and a competitive diver for 5 years. She is recounting some of her more infamous injuries.

‘Facing’ her hardest foe ever – the diving board.

Jesse's history of injury goes way back.

My most terrifying injury occurred during a diving competition in high school.  I was performing an inward one-and-a-half (meaning: face the board, jump, and spin as fast as you can).  Here’s where it all went wrong – I did not get enough distance between my face and the board. I have a hard head, but not hard enough to withstand a plastic-coated metal diving board.   Read the rest of this entry »